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8+ Houseplants That Are Basically Impossible To Kill

Brittany Rae

We're all in this together.

Keeping plants alive is a difficult task. Sometimes life gets in the way, or you just straight-up don't know what you're doing. Sometimes you ask your roommate to water them, and instead, they bounce and head to a music festival. Stuff happens.

If you're ready to take the dive into the world of owning house plants, we're here for you. Let's check out some of the hardiest ones out there that you'd have to work hard to kill.

1. Snake plants

This is an unkillable plant. It is idiot-proof, I promise you. There are also 70 different species of snake plants, so you have a ton of options.

They don't need a lot of light, so they're ideal for low-light homes. Make sure the soil dries between waterings, and... that's it. Let it grow.

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2. Spider plants

Or, as I call it: snake plant, but make it dangly.

These guys are even easier than snake plants. They like direct sunlight (though indirect will do) and aren't fussy about their watering. Just make sure to water it more in the summer.

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3. Peace lilies

If you'd like your plant to flower, then peace lilies are definitely for you.

It's not picky about how much light it gets, and it is fine with minimal watering. Go forth and grow pretty flowers.

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4. Aglaonemas (Chinese Evergreen)

The Chinese Evergreen is a total bro. It tolerates any kind of light, but is a fan of indirect. It prefers for its soil to be dry between waterings. It does not mind cats.

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5. Cast iron plants

Not to be confused with a cast iron pan, which is a different cast iron subspecies.

It does like to be watered, but it will roll with everything else. Varying light? That's fine. Fluctuating temperatures? No problem.

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6. Lucky bamboo

Here's a brief list of the things you need to do to keep lucky bamboo alive:

  • Put it in water.

That's it, that's the whole list. It likes direct to indirect light, and don't put it near cold air.

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7. Heartleaf Philodendron

How pretty is this plant? I want to be its friend.

This is a Heartleaf Philodendron is a great beginner plant. Allow the soil to dry between waterings and give it moderate sunlight!

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8. Aloe

Aloe needs some prep before it can thrive. It should be potted in cactus soil and have a pot that drains well. Then stick it in direct sunlight and use as needed when you forget to use sunscreen.

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9. Succulents

You cannot kill succulents. You just can't. I believe this about you, and I believe it about me.

They need little water, so if you forget to water it? That's fine, that's how it rolls. Place it near bright light, make sure it drains properly, and you'll be good to go.

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10. Rubber plants

Rubber plants A) look tropical af, and B) are very hard to kill.

Place it in a well-lit area, make sure the soil dries between waterings, and watch it do its rubber plant thing.

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11. Bromeliads

If you're looking to add some color to your plant collection, Bromeliads are a great choice. It prefers moist soil and indirect sunlight.

It might take some work to get it to bloom, but it's so worth it.

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12. English Ivy

English Ivy is a classic plant. Give it its best shot at surviving you by placing it in a low, wide container. It enjoys direct to indirect sunlight, long walks on the beach, and regular watering.

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13. Cacti

You know what's even harder to kill than a succulent? A frickin' cactus.

You can't kill a cactus. Water it, make sure the pot can drain, and stick in the sun. You got this.

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14. Peperomia

Look at this beauty!

Peperomia come in a lot of colors and shapes, so you'll definitely find the right one for you. They thrive in moist soil and a more humid climate.

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15. ZZ Plant

Not to be confused with ZZ Top. Is that joke dated? It might be dated.

Anyway, the ZZ Plant can handle a lot. It can go without water for a while, and it doesn't need a lot of light, though of course, it thrives best with more of both.

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16. Pothos

These are great beginner houseplants. It can thrive in indirect to low light and needs moist soil. It isn't a fan of drafts.

Also, it's ivy, so it grows long. Perfect for that overgrown, brick-and-vine look from period movies.

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17. The Mighty Monstera

Beloved by home decor enthusiasts and artists everywhere, the iconic Monstera is actually pretty easy to care for. They prefer humidity and indirect sunlight. Allow the soil to dry between waterings!

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18. Ponytail palms

It looks like a palm tree straight out of a Dr. Seuss book, to be honest.

It's neither a palm, or a tree — it's actually a type of succulent, so you know you'll be able to keep it alive. If you keep it in direct sunlight for half the year, you can keep it in low light for the other half.

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19. Jade plants

So, get this: a jade plant is a type of succulent! I know, I learned something today, too!

Here's how not to kill this plant friend: put it in partial or indirect sunlight, water it. Boom, done.

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20. Nephrolepis

See that big, fluffy fern in the corner? That's Nephrolepis, and it might be for you.

They don't like direct sunlight or over-watering. They do have a fondness for humidity!

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21. Fittonias

It's tiny, it's cute, and it's easy to take care of. Also, it comes in the color pink.

They need peat soil and a drainable pot. Feel free to over water it, because it likes moisture!

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22. Dracaena

This spiky friend will need occasional pruning and some regular watering.

If you keep it away from direct sun and don't over water it, it will be the best conversation piece in your house.

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23. Prayer Plant

Meet the Prayer Plant. She's striped, she's bright, and she's cute af.

They're into well-lit areas and warm temperatures. Allow the soil to dry between waterings. Sit back and enjoy their purple undersides with the knowledge that you probably can't kill this plant.

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